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Utility-Scale Solar

Utility-scale solar has been generating reliable, clean electricity with a stable fuel price for decades. Developing utility-scale solar power is one of the fastest ways to reduce carbon emissions and put the United States on a path to a clean energy future.

Nearly 10,000 Solar projects over 1 MW are in operation or development across the U.S.

Utility-Scale Solar Power

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Utility-scale solar has been generating reliable, clean electricity with a stable fuel price for decades. Solar power plants can be developed in a way that balances environmental protection with our energy demands and climate goals. By enacting federal policies to accelerate growth of utility-scale solar, we can continue creating jobs nationwide and diversifying America’s energy portfolio. Developing utility-scale solar power is one of the fastest ways to reduce carbon emissions and put the United States on a path to a clean energy future. 

Quick Facts

A utility-scale solar power plant can utilize several solar technologies – primary photovoltaics (PV) or concentrating solar power (CSP). What distinguishes utility-scale solar from distributed generation is both project size and the fact that the electricity is sold to wholesale utility buyers, not end-use consumers. Utility-scale solar plants provide the benefit of fixed-priced electricity during peak demand periods when electricity from fossil fuels is the most expensive.

Many utility-scale solar designs can also include energy storage capacity that provides power when the sun is not shining, and increases grid reliability and resiliency. Utility customers have repeatedly endorsed investments in utility-scale solar plants.

Utility-scale solar creates jobs across the supply chain, from R&D and engineering to manufacturing and project finance to development and construction.

The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA)

In 1978, Congress passed the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) to encourage fuel diversity via alternative energy sources and to introduce competition into the electric sector. As solar prices have fallen over the last decade, PURPA has become an attractive option for solar developers. PURPA continues to be a significant driver of utility-scale solar installations moving forward. To learn more about PURPA and its implications for solar, download our PURPA 101 Factsheet.

Long-Term Contracting Authority

An unintended consequence of current federal acquisition law is the limited authority of the executive branch to enter into long-term clean energy contracts. For example, most federal agencies cannot enter into Power Purchase Agreements (PPA) with terms longer than 10 years. Unfortunately, this truncated timeline stymies the financial viability of many deserving projects that could reduce energy costs, meet clean energy requirements and create jobs. Congress has signaled support for long-term clean energy contracting authority for the entire executive branch, and it should do so now to create private-sector jobs, shift federal energy use away from foreign sources, hedge against rises in electricity rates and reduce federal electricity expenses. Click here to download SEIA's Factsheet on Long-Term Contracting Authority.

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